Use these top 5 one-two punch expo booth ideas to hit visitors hard with the unique experience you create at the expo, and by being memorable. The definition of the one-two punch is an especially forceful or effective combination or sequence of two things.”

To make an impact at a big crowded trade show, identify your power source as an exhibitor. Specifically, what is the customer pain point and your big solution. The pain is the left lead punch and the solution is the right cross punch that immediately follows. Let’s go for the knock out.

1. Your Exhibit Space Is Your Boxing Ring

Ever wonder why the square area that defines a boxing match is called a ring, not a square? It comes from an earlier time when a group would stand back and make a ring to watch, and bet on two men duking it out. All eyes were focused within the ring.

So, do you set-up a trade show booth design that consist of table that you stand behind, perhaps with a dainty table skirt, keeping your distance from your visitor. Using the boxing analogy, how can you engage the customer using a different exhibit design strategy to deliver your one-two punch?

Make a bigger presence with a tower design or ceiling hanger

Make a bigger presence with a tower design or ceiling hanger

Establish your space and create a world where, unlike a boxing ring, the punch relieves the prospect’s pain. Be seen from a distance using height. A simple round ceiling hanger or a tower design with an elevated rectangle or round banner establishes your arena and uses height to make your presence bigger and stronger then your competitors.

A cushioned floor mat also defines your space and subliminally encourages longer visits, as people are relieved to get a break from the hard exhibit hall floor. Set the stage and deliver the one-two punch at every point-of-connection.

2. Focus All Eyes On The Real Star of The Show

We all think of our brand name as the star of our little tradeshow booth and want to display it boldly. Using the “What’s In It For Me” question that every prospect has, think about the real star from their perspective, the problem you solve.

To the prospect your solution to their pain point is the star

To the prospect your solution to their pain point is the star

A ceiling hanger or tower approach is an effective use of the one-two punch strategy. The brand name can be flashed on high, and your solution can be front and center, as your trade show booth backdrop. If there are several product lines, or solutions, you want to feature, placing the brand name as the overhead, umbrella theme; then the product, or pain-relief, stations within your ring brings the customer’s unique brand experience together.

3. Make a Public Spectacle

I read Jay Conrad Levinson book, Gorilla Marketing, awhile ago. Making A Public Spectacle was the headline for the trade show booth chapter. Going beyond the physical booth space is where some great gorilla marketing ideas begin.

If there are speaking opportunities, expert panels or seminars that you can lead, make sure you go for it and get exposure. You are the expert in your field and you have the best solutions, so tell the world. Your instant celebrity status will motivate people to meet you by visiting you on the trade show floor.

Go the distance by creating mutual partners and making sales at the Expo

Go the distance by creating mutual partners and making sales at the Expo

Go around and meet other exhibitors. If their product or business complements yours, become mutual partners right on the spot by encouraging people to visit each other’s exhibit. After the show meet to strategize, share your lists and develop new innovations to create emerging trends never seen in your industry before.

Launch a new product at the show. Invite the press to a press conference and generate local and trade show media exposure.

Make a spectacle of yourself to earn trust, establish yourself and induce people to come to you.

4. Establish Your Team and a Schedule

I once was involved in a trade show as a marketing director. I had set-up all the elements. The sales force sent in a team to “work” the booth. At one point I witnessed the entire sales team meeting at the rear of the booth determining their evening plans, and ignoring anyone who passed by. When I questioned them they said they were at it for 10 hours and they all needed a break. They were right. The next day we set up shifts. We had less people in the booth, but they were sharp for the limited time they were scheduled for.

I also had my own business and spent all day at a trade show exhibit I invested in. It was brutal because it’s hard to stay focused for so many hours. I changed the situation by enlisting clients, business partners and informed family members to visit the show and schedule time to work at my booth.

In Gorilla Marketing Jay recommends having personable, extroverted and friendly people staffing your booth. They should have product knowledge and be able to sell. The benefit of working with clients and business partners is that they can sell your product from their perspective. They have experienced the pain points that your product relieves and can tell the story about their experience.

5. Be Prepared to Sell

I ran a Food and Wine Festival for many years. We arranged for some high-end wineries to sample their product at the event through a distributor. I wanted the wineries to have the ability to sell wine at the fair, but due to state laws it was not permissible. This didn’t stop us. We set up a deal with the distributor and local retailers to sell wine at a festival discount. Wineries presented a flyer that participants presented at local sellers of their wines, so attendees could stock-up on fabulous wines, at a discount.

Presenting your product’s benefits at a trade show is a good thing, making a sale is even better. Always look at ways to sell product at the show. If there are restrictions, brainstorm ways to work around them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kevin Danaher

Kevin’s career spans over 30 years where he worked for New York Sales Promotion and Advertising agencies such as Ventura Associates, and BBDO developing promotional campaigns for some of the world’s leading brands including VISA, General Electric, Kraft/General Foods, Fidelity Investments, and Chrysler. Read More